Around the world in Black and White – Milford Sound, New Zealand

This week, we will travel through time and space to revisit five destinations we have already visited, only that this time, we will look at them through black-and-white glasses. Given that the word ‘colors’ makes up half of the name of this blog, you are quite right if you guessed that this was not my idea – I was invited to this challenge by fellow blogger Jill’s Scene. In the third part of this series, we travel to her home country New Zealand.

One of the stops on our journey around the South Island was the lakeside town of Te Anau, and we came there with plans for hiking. When we woke up to torrential rain however, we abandoned this plan and drove our rental car up to Milford Sound. With all the humidity, and not expecting that the sound would indeed be stunning in the rainy and overcast weather, I took only a small point-and-shoot camera with me – a decision that I came to regret more and more with every massive waterfall we passed on the way. I was never quite happy with the rendering of greens in the jpegs from that camera, and for the B/W challenge, I want to see if I can ‘rescue’ one of the images I took there. This is the original version of the picture:

Milford Sound - Colours

I applied a monochrome filter to the image, and, cheating a little bit on the B/W theme, added a split toning effect that brings a bit of yellow into the highlights and a bit of blue into the shadows. This the result:

Milford SoundWhich of the images do you prefer?

The rules of the B/W challenge ask me not only to post a black-and-white image every day on five consecutive days but also to nominate a new participant in each of these posts. It is clear that whoever made these rules trusted us to break them – or the challenge would soon have reached every blogger on this planet. Instead, I would like to invite everyone to this challenge who feels compelled to do it.

16 thoughts on “Around the world in Black and White – Milford Sound, New Zealand

  1. luciledegodoy

    I love the BW as it brings forward all the ‘drama’. The contrast is superb. The composition idem. Well done! It really doesn’t matter that you used a point and shoot camera. The image is stunning.

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  2. Cate

    While they are both beautiful, I think I prefer the original.
    I went to Te Anau about 8 years ago and hiked the Kepler Track. It poured with rain the morning I set off but thankfully cleared later. It was a spur of the moment decision and I had an amazing hike. Sorry you didn’t get to do it.

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    1. perelincolors

      The gear we had with us was certainly not appropriate for a hike in the rain, sounds like you were much better prepared! But the good thing about NZ is that even driving in the rain can be stunning.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Jill's Scene

    I must have seen hundreds of images of Milford Sound over time and they are nearly always from the same perspective. So for me, what stands out about your photos is the unique composition. They’re from an angle that’s fresh to my eye and made me look at the photo more closely, than I might have otherwise. I think I understand what you mean about the green. Although, as yet, I haven’t been to Milford Sound, the green in this photo isn’t the shade of green I’d anticipate from my other travels around the South Island. Nevertheless, I like the colour photo best. It draws me into the scene more than the back and white.

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  4. Hilary's Global Café

    Hmmm… I like the original because the fuzziness in the islets/rocks with the vegetation on them in the background is not as pronounced. My eye wants them to be sharper. But I also like the strong pull of the contrast in the grasses in b&w. That is where my eye first goes.

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    1. perelincolors

      I know what you mean about the fuzziness. In defense of the little camera, I have to admit that it is caused by actual water and humidity on the lens – it really was a very wet and rainy day!

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      1. Hilary's Global Café

        😀 Yes, I figured that had something to with it after the fact. I could see the serious mist off to the side, which really added a great feature to the photo. The humidity and moisture on lens can be a real shocker for me! This was especially bad during our trip to Japan in the middle of July. I took a pile of pics on the first couple of days without looking at them and was surprised when I finally saw them much later. One misty, whiteout pic after another! 😀 I didn’t think that our camera would need so long to get acclimatized!

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  5. Debbie

    hi, like the Scotland images I just looked at, the colours and depth are so stunning that looking at the b and w pics seems…. lacking. if we saw the b and w images first, maybe they’d simply stand on their own.
    having said that, i think this one makes the change better than the scotland one.
    the grass fronds at the front make the transition into black and white causing visual contrast, and the whole image is so stunning regardless of b and w or colour.
    nevertheless, i still prefer to look at the colour image simplybecause of the mix of depth and perspective with colour that enrichens and deepens the perspective – and makes you feel like you are just there.

    you’ve made me want to go to NZ!!!!!

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    1. perelincolors

      It’s very interesting how we all tend to have different preferences! I this post, I prefer the b/w image, while in the one for Scotland I agree that the b/w is lacking something when compared to the others.

      New Zealand is a really pretty place, you should definietly visit if you get a chance!

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